(701) 566-9049 info@crossfiticehouse.com
Introducing Icehouse Movement!

Introducing Icehouse Movement!

What is Icehouse Movement?

Icehouse Movement is a program that determines the cause behind painful movement and corrects the problem so that you can move without pain. Think of it this way. There is a road between you and your goal, but it is currently blocked by pain, injury, and imbalances. Icehouse movement finds a way to remove those road blocks so that you have a clear road to chase down those goals!

Who?

Icehouse movement is a personal program, meaning that it is specific to you and your needs. However, it requires someone who is consistent and willing to do the work. 15 minutes, 3 days a week, before or after class. Ideal candidates are on the committed to their fitness, if you don’t come to the gym at least three days a week, it’s difficult to do extra work those three days.

How doses it work?

Step 1: Choose a Program

We have two options, a virtual membership ($120/ Month), and an in person membership ($180/ Month). Virtual memberships include, initial movement screen, strength balance test, bi-weekly programming, and unlimited virtual check-ins. In person memberships include, monthly movement screen, quarterly strength balance test, bi-weekly programming, and unlimited virtual as well as in person check-ins.

Step 2: Movement Screen

The movement screen is an evaluation that we use to determine the “low hanging fruit.” This screen allows me to see if there is any obvious issues, such as lack of ankle mobility, making it difficult to squat to depth. In the event that there are no big neon signs saying FIX ME the movement screen will tell me where to look. It takes about 15 minutes, and is a great tool for your own understanding of your body.

Step 4: Strength Balance Test

The strength balance test is similar to the movement screen, but much more in depth. This test assesses the force production between the front and back of your body as well as your left to right strength balance. This test takes around an hour to complete and is extremely valuable to any athlete looking to get the most out of their training.

Step 5: Complete the Programming

You will recieve an email on Sunday evening containing two weeks worth of programming. This program is not a replacement for CrossFit classes. It is designed to compliment the programming here at Icehouse, or at your gym. It will take about 15 minutes three days a week. All you need to do is follow the program and provide feedback! I use that feedback to make sure the programming is on point and get results.

Step 6: Repeat

Every two weeks you will recieve programming to direct you toward your goals. All you need to do is do the work. We have had several clients experience positive results within the first two weeks. Lasting physical change takes time, most clients are pain free within 3 months. This program will give you every opportunity to achieve your goals. Let me remove the road blocks, so that you have a clear path to the finish line.

I’m really excited for this program, and I am already seeing great results from my clients.  If you are interested in Icehouse Movement, set up a consultation with me, Coach Traps, at the front desk.

 

Squats on squats on squats

Squats on squats on squats

The Squat

In the dynamic, multi-joint movements that are practiced in every Flux class there is a foundational movement that must be mastered before any more complex movement should be attempted. These foundational movements build strength, stability, and ensure that our range of motion is safely being utilized. What’s funny peculiar, not funny haha, is that these movements are so foundational that some of the best examples are kids.

No joke. Ask a toddler to pick something up off the floor. They don’t bend forward and strain their lower backs and over-extend their hamstrings like we adults do. They squat. With nigh-perfect form! Their knees are wide, their chests are up, and they go diaper to dirt with their heels down. As adults stuck at desks or in cars for most of our lives, we have lost a lot of the flexibility in our hips and ankles, and strength in our backs to perform a healthy, strong squat. It takes those of us who have forgotten how to move a long time before we get that back.


Squats are used in almost everything. Imagine Bubba Gump and his shrimp; that’s how many movements use a squat. Air squats, front squats, overhead squats, back squats, squat cleans, squat snatches, box jumps, med-ball cleans, wall-balls, thrusters, and so on. And that’s just in the gym! Squats are fundamental in everyday life, the most obvious and basic being using the bathroom.

A strong healthy squat has several key points of performance. Starting from the ground up, the heels must remain on the floor. If a person has tight Achilles’ tendons or stiff hips, knees, or ankles, the squat might not reach depth which means the hips might not descend below the knees. And that’s ok! The more the ankles are working, the more flexibility will be built in the Achilles so that the squat can sit lower.

The knees must follow the path of the toes. The toes are pointed slightly out instead of straight forward. In order to save undue strain on the knees, they must follow the path of the toes. This means the knees are wide at the same time finding an even distribution of weight through the foot. For a depth squat, the hip crease gets below the knee crease. This activates the big muscle groups of the thighs, your quads and adductors, as well as the glutes.

As you work on flexibility in the lower half of the body, you will also be working on strengthening the core and back. The chest is meant to be as upright as possible in the squat. This means bracing the abdominals to support the torso, and in order to balance the body the erectors of the spine are activated. There’s a lot going on, but once the air squat is mastered the body is ready for any variation of the squat.

Squats are great not only for making one’s butt look good, they also build strength, stamina, cardio endurance, flexibility, and a host of other skills that make a person a better athlete. Can’t make it to the gym one day? Crunched for time? Want a leg day but don’t have weights around? Rock out 100 squats. Your heart rate rise, you’ll sweat, and you will certainly feel it in your legs.

#diamondbutts

5 Steps to Become a Better Runner

Running season is here in Fargo! Here are 5 tips to help you get back into running after a long winter.

5 Steps to Become a Better Runner

1) Start Slow

I know you are anxious to get back into running, but be sure to have a plan that fits your current ability level. When someone decides to train for a marathon, they don’t start out by running 26.2 miles on the first day. Select a distance that you can comfortably cover, and slowly bring that volume up. For someone just learning about running or getting back into running I recommend starting out with a 20 minute walk a few days a week. For a beginner, a sample program would look something like 20 minutes, run 1 minute, walk 90 seconds. For an intermediate it may look like 2 miles 3 days a week. For advanced runners there are several different variations and programs to get the volume you need. After you get more comfortable with your baseline you can start to add volume by adding in an extra day of running each week, or adding miles to one of the days. Be sure to stay with this new volume for a few weeks to allow your body to adjust, that way you will be able to recover in time for your next run.

2) Warm Up & Cool Down

It’s easy to just jum right into a run and think “I’ll just warm up as I go.” Thats not the best plan, you wouldn’t load up the bar with your 1 Rep Max squat without any warm up, and you shouldnt do that for running either. A good warm up for running that wont add much time to your workout is 5 minutes of stretching, followed by 5 minutes of walking leading into a light jog and eventually into your running pace. A proper warm up is critical to preventing injuries. Cooling down can be just as important to your injury prevention as your warm up. A proper cool down gradually brings your body back to its pre-exercise state. A good cool down can be as simple as a 10 minute walk at the end of your run followed by 5 minutes of stretching. The extra time is well spent on a proper warm up and cool down.

3) Explore the Area Parks

There are several parks in Fargo that offer great running opportunities. Believe me, a run is much more enjoyable when the scenery consists of more than your neighborhood block or city buildings. Check out an interactive map of Fargo Parks. My personal favorite is any of the trails along the Red River, as long as they are not under water of course!

4) Be Consistent

It is extremely unlikely to set out and be an all star runner on your very first day. Determine what days you can work running into your schedule. Make a plan and stick to it! No mater where you are on your running journey, a dedicated plan that you are consistent with will get you where you want to be. If your goal is to run a marathon or a 5k or even just to get outside you have to commit. Be sure to warm up and cool down each and every time you run. If the weather stops your run try your best to fit it in another day. A good way to make sure you stay consistent is by telling your self what you DO want to do instead of what you don’t want to do. Instead of “I don’t want to go for a run today because it’s raining.” Tell yourself “I feel like doing extra recovery today so that I can run more on Saturday.”

5) Find a Running Partner

Finding someone to run with can be great fun. You can hold eachother accountable and challenge one another to push toward your goals. There are several members around our gym who would be willing to help you find a running buddy. Another great resource is Beyond Running, not only can they help you get all of the apparel and shoes you may need, they are extremely knowledgable and will point you in the right direction when it comes to finding running groups as well as some advanced tecniques to improve even more.

 

If you found this blog helpful, leave us a comment with your running plan!
Coach Skeds “Top 4” Mobility Movements

Coach Skeds “Top 4” Mobility Movements

I’ve compiled a list of my Top 4 mobility movements that I do weekly.  I have been working for months to develop a deeper squat.  After spending almost 20 years in the military walking around in nothing but combat boots I have developed some pretty tight ankles.  I also like to spend some quality time making sure my hips and glutes are flexible enough for squatting.  Check out my favorite mobility movements below. (more…)

Coach Omaha “Top 4 Mobility”

Coach Omaha “Top 4 Mobility”

These are my top 4 mobility movements to loosen up my hips. I use this series after I workout almost 3 times a week to keep things bendy. (more…)